copyright by Jessica Klein - all rights reserved
Playing the Bagpipe - a challenge

Another big wrong conclusion is :

If your are able to play the English flute you are able to play the Scottish Bagpipe.

Already the construction of the Great Highland Bagpipe indicates easily sparsely common features in comparison with an English flute.
The Great Highland Bagpipe is no instrument, to 

be learnt autodidactically.

The sources of error by learning the wrong

way are more than likely.

The demanding finger- and breathing tech-

niques  require  a  fastidious  instruction  if  you 

desire  doing  it  correctly  and  wish  to  enjoy  your

playing! 
The Great Highland Bagpipe b
elongs to the family of reed instruments.

It contains one double reed for the chanter and three single reeds - one for each drone - which all are set to vibration with a constant stream of air. This causes the melody, sound and unmistakable continuous tone.
The air supply is made with the blowpipe into the bag from where the air is distributed to all four reeds of the Bagpipe.

Those reeds demand a steady pressure of air which is mainly (but specially while inhaling) held by the pressure of the pipers arm / elbow. This technique is known as steady blowing.

              Withal  the  Great  Highland  Bagpipe  is   very                       sensitive: fluctuation of  the pressure leads                              to fluctuation of the sound.
                               The finger techniques  of  the  Great                                     Highland   Bagpipe  is  half  closed.

                                    A  pitch  range  of  nine  notes are                                provided by the Bagpipe.

                       As a result of the steady air stream neither                   the  continuous  tone  nor  the melody will be        interrupted nor the volume can be changed. Special finger techniques -embellishments - are needed.
With those a piper intermits equal notes that come after another or emphasizes particular  parts of a tune.

To meet the requirements of a Great Highland Bagpipe patience and regular practice are unavoidable.

Those reeds demand a steady pressure of air which is mainly (but specially while inhaling) held by the pressure of the pipers arm / elbow. This technique is known as steady blowing.

Withal the Great Highland Bagpipe is very sensitive: fluctuation of the pressure leads to fluctuation of the sound.
The finger techniques of the Great Highland Bagpipe is half closed.

A pitch range of nine notes are provided by the Bagpipe.

As a result of the steady air stream neither the continuous tone nor the melody will be interrupted nor the volume can be changed. Special finger techniques -embellishments - are needed.
With those a piper intermits equal notes that come after another or emphasizes particular  parts of a tune.

To meet the requirements of a Great Highland Bagpipe patience and regular practice are unavoidable.